Pain Revolution FREE Seminars from Geelong to Gippsland

By |2020-01-08T11:24:03+11:00January 7th, 2020|Help, Personal, Professional|

FREE Pain Education events are coming to your town! If you’ve been following my blog, you would have read that this year I’ve decided not to look into research so much. I’ve decided I’m going to ‘sit with my confusion’. [...]

Bitter Sweet and Still Confused

By |2020-01-03T16:31:16+11:00January 3rd, 2020|Blog, The pain|

That was my endnote for 2019. As life evolves within my 3km radius, I find myself looking back less and less and looking forward more and more. Bitter, defines the heartache of not being able to see loved ones as often and the missing perks of our previous city life. Sweet, is being defined by new friends, the gallery, our new home and the sea that surrounds us. As for confused, another year has passed and I still don't feel anyone can quite define what's going on with my body. Does it matter heading into a new year?

Frida Kahlo: Portrait of Chronic Pain

By |2018-06-09T11:31:59+10:00June 9th, 2018|Learn, Professional Resources, Read|

The Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907–1954) is one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century. Although famous for her colorful self-portraits and associations with celebrities Diego Rivera and Leon Trotsky, less known is the fact that she had lifelong chronic pain. Frida Kahlo developed poliomyelitis at age 6 years, was in a horrific trolley car accident in her teens, and would eventually endure numerous failed spinal surgeries and, ultimately, limb amputation. She endured several physical, emotional, and psychological traumas in her lifetime, yet through her art, she was able to transcend a life of pain and disability. Of her work, her self-portraits are conspicuous in their capacity to convey her life experience, much of which was imbued with chronic pain. Signs and symptoms of chronic neuropathic pain and central sensitization of nociceptive pathways are evident when analyzing her paintings and medical history. This article uses a narrative approach to describe how events in the life of this artist contributed to her chronic pain. The purpose of this article is to discuss Frida Kahlo's medical history and her art from a modern pain sciences perspective, and perhaps to increase our understanding of the pain experience from the patient's perspective.

Trust me, I’m a patient: pain education for professionals from a lay perspective

By |2017-12-11T09:19:31+11:00November 1st, 2017|Learn, Professional Resources|

Unfortunately, it is all too common for the professional not to listen to the patient and not to believe in their pain. The focus on the ‘relief of suffering’ has almost got lost in modern medicine’s search for diagnosis and cure. It is hard enough to be coping with pain, but terrifying not to be believed when one goes for help. It should not take months of suffering and inadequate (or no) pain relief before a patient finally gets to a pain clinic.

Men & Women: Pelvic Pain Relief + Your First PT Appointment w/ Dr. Susie G

By |2017-12-11T09:16:54+11:00September 7th, 2017|Learn, Professional Resources|

36 minutes of brilliant pelvic pain and awareness conversation with two very experienced professionals. Thank you Fem Fusion and Dr Susie Gronski. Excerpt from Men & Women: Pelvic Pain Relief + Your First PT [...]

Not the fitball’s fault – it’s Nav1.7’s

By |2017-12-09T15:38:29+11:00May 15th, 2017|Learn, Professional Resources|

In his theory, a stimulus triggers the Nav1.7 channel to open just long enough to allow the necessary amount of sodium ions to pass through, which then enables messages of stinging, soreness, or scalding to register in the brain. When the trigger subsides, Nav1.7 closes.