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Trust me, I’m a patient: pain education for professionals from a lay perspective

Author:

Lay member, British Pain Society Patient Liaison Committee

A young woman with arthritis talking about the rising tide of hostility to disability claimants says: ‘People think I’m faking. I’ve lost friends over it. Pain is invisible and hard for people to understand.’ How many of us could say that we have never thought that someone reporting pain is faking or, at the very least, making too much fuss? This is the society in which we live: intolerant of the pain of others. From childhood onwards we are told to stop whingeing and are often not believed when we report pain. Adults can be intolerant of their partner’s pain and in the workplace colleagues seldom treat kindly weakness of any sort.

These preconceptions and attitudes to other people’s pain are what professionals may have grown up with and may subconsciously bring to the clinical setting. Pain education for professionals should focus not only on the methods of treatment available but equally on the impact of pain and the need to listen to and believe the patient’s story. Pain is what the patient says it is and if he or she has come to you for help, there will be very few instances in which pain relief must be withheld whilst a diagnosis is sought. And yet, often pain management is not addressed until all the avenues of diagnostic tests, scans and specialist opinions have been explored. Students need good communication skills and empathy, and they should be encouraged to think about their own attitudes to pain and how these might affect their professional practice. They should learn that there are very few conditions for which pain relief must be withheld until a diagnosis is made. For the majority of people adequate pain relief can be achieved before a diagnosis is made.

Continue Reading

Diagnosis: A Can of Worms

Author:
Can-of-Worms

WARNING: This post contains serious attitude as a result of 10 years of personal experience with chronic pain. The post also contains my personal no nonsense view of living with a chronic illness and (much required) rotten sense of humour, whopping reality check and bonus kick up the backside for anyone who refuses to accept they have a serious health issue.

*Proceed with caution*

Well, surely you can’t blame me for having that kind of attitude after 10 years!

Recently, it dawned on me that when I was diagnosed with chronic pain, it felt like I had been handed a can of worms.

I’ve been mulling over this thought while procrastinating about a second follow-up appointment since my sacral neurostimulator treatment. Specifically, I thought about the time that goes by while I – sometimes neglect to face the intensity of my health issue and what the consequences are as a result of that neglect.

Yep, it translated to a can of worms. Continue Reading

Men & Women: Pelvic Pain Relief + Your First PT Appointment w/ Dr. Susie G

Author:
FemFusion and Dr Susie Gronski

36 minutes of brilliant pelvic pain and awareness conversation with two very experienced professionals. Thank you Fem Fusion and Dr Susie Gronski.

Excerpt from Men & Women: Pelvic Pain Relief + Your First PT Appointment w/ Dr. Susie Gronski YouTube link – please read the warning about language used during this clip.

FemFusion Fitness
Published on 16 Aug 2017

Expert Interview with Dr. Susie Gronski, PT, DPT about DIY pelvic pain relief that you can start doing at home, PLUS what to expect from your first pelvic floor physical therapy appointment! The information provided in this video is for females and males. Continue Reading

Yes, it is like taming a beast

Author:

You’ve all heard the impact Prof Lorimer Moseley made on my pain journey – well my diagnosis actually.

If it weren’t for him I wonder how much longer I would have been left searching for the reason behind (pardon the pun) the pain. It took 4.5 years!

Lorimer’s research continues and this time he’s teamed up with some fabulous physiotherapists to make a lighthearted – but still serious, animation about chronic pain.

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Not the fitball’s fault – it’s Nav1.7’s

Author:

How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Pain

(Excerpt from How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Human Suffering by Erika Hayasaki | art by Sean Freeman 04.18.17 on Wired)

…When Stephen Waxman was a student at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the early 1970s, he became interested in painhow people feel it, how the body transmits it, and how, as a future neurologist, he could learn to control it. Later in his career, after his father was in the final stages of agonizing diabetic neuropathy, he became obsessed with helping patients like his dad, who could find no relief from their pain. “We simply had to do better,” he says. Continue Reading

Resources for Treating Chronic Pain by the Victoria Pain Specialists (Vicpain) …MY pain team!

Author:

Forgive my bossiness but this post comes from a desperate experience that I lived for 4.5 years. That’s a long time for someone with increasing chronic pain levels and not much hope. I felt isolated and alone in a very foreign world without appropriate treatment, compassion and understanding.

Nine years later, I’m hopeful a situation like mine can be prevented with the knowledge provided in the following resources. Vicpain are leaders in pain treatment and management, I can certainly vouch for that!

Please read the resources, learn them, share them… and if you require information on chronic pain, follow Vicpain. Continue Reading

Retrainpain.org

Author:

It’s finally filtering through my brain: It’s going to be VERY hard work most days and it’s up to me to keep my butt in gear and stay on the treatment and management trail.

You’ll all be getting sick of reading my badger about this, but the research is out. Patient experiences have been in the making (for decades now), and the biggest sign that the hard work is cut out for people with chronic pain comes from the many who are now drug dependent with either increasing levels of pain or who sadly have lost their lives – not from the medication – but from the battle.

I get sick of filtering through paragraphs and words and med talk that I don’t quite understand (not to mention the pain levels soar for some peculiar reason) and as an artist, I still find it really difficult to present my pain experience to my readers, family and friends in a simple form.

Continue Reading

A new DVD resource, Healing the Pain ‘Down There’: A Guide for Females with Persistent Genital and Sexual Pain

Author:


There have been many times during my years of chronic pain where I wondered, ‘Why didn’t I know that?’. Usually, the information is quite basic and I feel as though I’ve been deprived by never knowing something so crucial and important about my own body.

I was asked to view and give feedback before this thorough resource was released, and a few times, throughout the 284 minutes of run time, I asked myself, ‘Why didn’t I know that?’.

This DVD isn’t just about managing pain, but rather a clear and concise  resource for females… It should be put on some International educational agenda. Continue Reading

Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA, Making Sense of Pain June 26 – 27, 2015

Author:

Calling all Health Professionals
“MAKING SENSE OF PAIN”
Our fourth inter-disciplinary workshop

Register now.
Early bird registrations close on 12th June!

Presenters & RegistrantsWe offer health professionals a unique opportunity to update their knowledge and skills and to effectively transfer them into their clinical practice setting.

Our experienced team, which comprises “pain champions” together with experienced clinicians and researchers, present a unique learning experience conducted in a user-friendly environment.

Date: Friday 26th – Saturday 27th June, 2015.

Presenters: Ms Melanie Galbraith (Physiotherapist), Assoc-Professor Vance Locke (Academic Psychologist), Ms Jane Muirhead (Occupational Therapist), Dr John Quintner (Physician in Rheumatology and Pain Medicine), Ms Mary Roberts (Clinical Psychologist).

Pain champions: to be announced

Venue: Wyllie Arthritis Centre, 17 Lemnos St. SHENTON PARK WA

[N.B. This workshop is fully catered and FREE on-site parking is available.]

For details and to Register or contact:
Melanie Galbraith, MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au or
John Quintner, jqu33431@bigpond.net.au

View information about previous workshops

Dr Doidge, Are Some Brains More Plastic than Others?

Author:

I never shop from my phone, but given Theo and I were away for the weekend (researching our next phase of life), I felt it was worth the risk responding to The School of Life‘s Dr Norman Doidge event and booked our two tickets.

Glad I did. The event was sold out within the week and over 300 people were on the cancellation list.

In 2011, after my peripheral stimulation device was implanted (and having my reading ability restored), I reached for  Dr Doidge‘s, The Brain That Changes Itself, and grasped the idea to contact Prof Lorimer Moseley who was referenced within the book.

That idea led to my diagnosis.

So my mind ran. What might happen if I actually met Dr Doidge?! Continue Reading

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Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

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