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injured worker

Injured workers, here comes the royal commission we’ve been waiting for

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Senate Passes Resolution Calling For Royal Commission Into Banking Industry

Injured workers, if there’s just one more email or letter to write, it’s this one to Senator John Williams. I’ll personally be sending all my insurance related posts to the Senator.

(Hansard transcript of Senate debate on the Banking and Financial Services motion.)

Senator WONG (South Australia—Leader of the Opposition in the Senate) (12:25): I move:

That—

(a) the Senate notes that:

(i) confidence and trust in the financial services industry has been shaken by ongoing revelations of scandals, which have resulted in tens of thousands of Australians being ripped off, including:

and further down the post

Senator GALLAGHER: And only a royal commission that you, Senator Williams, have been arguing for, for some time. The response from the government has been completely inadequate. Listen to the stories of those people whose lives have been affected, whose houses have been lost, whose retirement savings have vanished, whose businesses have folded and who have been arguing for years—eight to 10 years, for some people—for some sense of justice. This is what this motion seeks and that is what a royal commission will find.

… read the full transcript of the Senate debate.
Write to Senator John Williams (senator.williams@aph.gov.au)

My email to Senator Williams written 28 December, 2016

(The email also included many of my insurance related posts)

Dear Senator Williams,

I am a self employed injured worker. My ordeal has gone on nearly 10 years. My husband and I have just begun a new life in Queenscliff after having to sell our home and move from our beloved family, friends and community in Collingwood where we lived for 17 years.

I’ve experienced horrid treatment as an injured worker but the ultimate blow came when we had to sell our home because of an insurer excuse that to this day I still can’t really understand (neither can the Ombudsman, my lawyer or a friend’s contact working at the Vic Bar). I’m sure you will understand it and certainly the Ombudsman’s report, point 385 helped shed some light but unfortunately I’m still here without any compensation or treatment help and worst of all, my chronic pain continues.

I’m doing everything I can to live with my health issue and so is my husband – we’ve even started a new business that is completely customised to my abilities in the attempt we can work. Everything is on the line.

Below are all the posts I’ve written on my website. It’s the only way I felt I could communicate what was happening and help others in the process.

I’d happily speak up anywhere, anytime, and you are welcome to use any of the following information to argue the horrid experiences injured workers have had to bare.

A horrid equation: Medical + Legal = Medical Panels

Author:

From where I’m standing, you could never believe our Government has set up a system to support injured workers.

This very system that was established (apparently) for the injured worker is very well calculated and excruciating to navigate and whilst navigating it, the injured worker usually remains unfed and untreated.

My complete process from application to outcome and reimbursement of weekly payments (if I ‘win’) could go on almost a year. And there was a year before that when the system threw me into a disillusioned hole when it pulled the rug from under me after I declared a part time work capacity.

If you’re an injured worker reading this – don’t ever declare a part time capacity until you’re sure you have a solid one.

Whichever way you look at the situation for injured workers, the equation always adds up to unnecessary, unfair and insensitive treatment.

While I wait for the Medical Panels to send me their decision, their faces, movements, questions and gestures swirl around my head and I try desperately to guess the outcome.

Even at 2am, I fail to guess. It should be simple to go to an appointment and explain your personal health status shouldn’t it? It’s simple for my pain team.

However it isn’t simple for the Medical Panel because it’s not an appointment, it’s an assessment – they’re not the same. From my experience, this assessment is a full blown investigation and that so severely changes the experience… and my heart rate. I doubt I need to state that this scenario changes my pain levels but if I do, head back to page 1 of this website and start reading again. Continue Reading

Who am I going to be – Soula ‘a’, ‘b’ or ‘c’?

Author:
_Sacral_stim

My new stim’s changed everything.

I’m grateful. Can you imagine if the whole process (from trial to permanent implant) hadn’t change anything?

In addition to the stim changing everything, I’m living a whole new life that Theo and I attempted to plan in great detail.

We’re trying to make me the best I can be so we can be… someway, somehow.

Life is unrecognisable and the path ahead is totally unfamiliar. To top that off, I need to figure out exactly how I can best be. I have choices.

Post op

After living with my sacral stim for six months, I can confirm the following: Continue Reading

I made a gallery

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True! Theo and I made a huge life move as many of you have read.

Our transition began over a year ago when we escaped to Tasmania to figure out how to manage life with chronic pain.

It was the best thing we did even though terrifying at the time.

In just over a year, we have spent four months in Tasmania, returned to our dear Collingwood, sold our warehouse sanctuary, removed ourselves from our main business (as it was impossible for me to do the previous design work), planned a new lifestyle, and began a new venture with the utmost faith and backing of some very dear arty friends and some special few design clients.

Again, terrifying. Continue Reading

This injured worker is about to burst

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Art & Chronic Pain - A Self Portrait

(Image from my book, Art & Chronic pain – A Self Portrait)

I’m going to erupt!

I feel I’ve been left without any avenue to vent the poor treatment I’ve experienced as an injured worker. I can’t make it any simpler :

I had a work accident and after declaring I had a p/t work capacity, I’m now left with $0.

That’s $0.

  • $0 financial help for any future treatment (currently undergoing thousands worth)
  • $0 wage top up
  • $0 superannuation
  • 0% return to work training or assistance
  • 0% guidance, and
  • 0° (except for this blog) to reasonably seek the promised help that I personally paid a 100% premium for in Victoria.

Wait, I have more to vent and please stay with me because you’re my only avenue remember? Continue Reading

Injured workers rising above

Author:

(By Rosemary McKenzie-Ferguson)

Bags of Love Op Shop will open on the 31st July 2015

It has taken a lot longer than any of us at the Centre would have liked- however after many tears and a lot of frustration and loads of laughter and an rather risqué fashion parade the Bags of Love Op Shop will open on the 31st July 2015 .

It is yet another first in the wonderful world of workers compensation as the Bags of Love Op Shop is run completely by injured workers for the benefit of injured workers as each of them rebuild their lives in ways that has never been seen or done before.

“Bags of Love” aim to provide basic food supplies as often as is possible to ease the burden on the injured worker and the injured worker families.

There won’t be any speeches, and there won’t be any ribbons cut and the Australian stock market won’t have a sudden movement to indicate the importance of the opening of the OP Shop. Continue Reading

Melbourne Leader story, Soula bares soul over pain

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The following story was published in support of the current National campaign: Nerve Pain is Different. Please help us raise awareness for those with debilitating invisible pain.

If you think you have nerve pain, talk to your doctor and visit www.nervepain.com.au. Complete the online questionnaire intended to help you explain your pain and take a printout to discuss with your doctor.

Melbourne Leader Mon 1 Dec

Resident shares story of coping with daily agony following fit ball accident

By Nic Price for the Melbourne Leader

SOULA Mantalvanos’ life was up-ended in 2007 when a fit ball she was sitting on burst and she dropped to the concrete floor.

She didn’t think much of it at the time and tried to continue her routine of yoga four times a week and regular walks, but that soon became impossible.

Dealing with chronic pain that made her feel like her “finger was stuck in a power point”, the Collingwood resident was not diagnosed until four-and-a-half years later with severe pudendal neuralgia nerve pain.

As she embarked on a journey of living with pain, Ms Mantalvanos and her husband turned their lives upside down in an attempt to find a better quality of life.

They closed their graphic design studio down (Ms Mantalvanos now works part- time) and even removed doors in their house so she wouldn’t have to open and close them.

“I’ve learned not to lift more than a few kilos, to sit a lot, get in the car a lot,” Ms Mantalvanos said. Continue Reading

Interactions Between Injured Workers and Insurers in Workers’ Compensation Systems: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research Literature.

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(Excerpt from Interactions Between Injured Workers and Insurers in Workers’ Compensation Systems: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research Literature.)

Finally, some research into claims management from the Institute for Safety Compensation and Recovery Research (ISCRR), Monash University by Kilgour E1, Kosny A, McKenzie D, Collie A.

Abstract

Introduction Work-related injury is a major public health problem and a worker’s recovery can be shaped by their interactions with employers, healthcare providers and the workers’ compensation system.

Most research on the effects of compensation has concentrated on examining outcomes rather than considering the compensation process itself.

There has been little attention paid to the interactions between stakeholders and only recently has the client’s view been considered as worthy of investigation. This systematic review aimed to identify and synthesize findings from peer reviewed qualitative studies that investigated injured workers interactions with insurers in workers’ compensation systems. Method A search of six electronic library databases revealed 1,006 articles. After screening for relevance, 18 articles were read in full and a search of those bibliographies revealed a further nine relevant articles. Quality assessment of the 27 studies resulted in a final 13 articles of medium and high quality being retained for data extraction. Results Included studies focused mainly on experiences of injured workers, many of whom had long term claims. Findings were synthesized using a meta-ethnographic approach. Six themes were identified which characterised the interactions between insurers and injured workers.

The majority of interactions were negative and resulted in considerable psychosocial consequences for injured workers. Positive interactions were less frequently reported and included respectful, understanding and supportive communication and efficient service from insurers.

Conclusion Findings from this synthesis support the growing consensus that involvement in compensation systems contributes to poorer outcomes for claimants. Interactions between insurers and injured workers were interwoven in cyclical and pathogenic relationships, which influence the development of secondary injury in the form of psychosocial consequences instead of fostering recovery of injured workers. This review suggests that further research is required to investigate positive interactions and identify mechanisms to better support and prevent secondary psychosocial harm to injured workers

Yet Another Comedy of Errors: Act III, the Outcome

Author:

Those on long term benefits should be cut like 'low hanging fruit', Denis Cosgrove wearing my compensation.Scene I

The long-awaited meeting takes place, as scheduled, 11 months after my lodgement of a 93cd application.

Theo and I, together with my WorkCover Assist representative met with the Conciliator and K – a rather gruff and insensitive guy who is representing my VWA-appointed Agent. We have not met him before nor to our knowledge has he been involved in managing my claim. From the outset, it was obvious that he would fight against us every inch of the way. You can well imagine that the spirit of conciliation was lost upon him. He offered no apology for his rude behaviour.

If you do not know, conciliation is a voluntary, flexible, confidential and interest based process. The parties seek to reach an amicable settlement of disputes with the assistance of the conciliator, who acts as a neutral third-party (whilst still abiding by the system’s own legislation).

Just to recapitulate, we had raised three important disputed issues for conciliation:

(i) that part payments for my medical expenses were still outstanding;

(ii) that contrary to the “expert” opinion of my Agent, my working capacity was still limited to 15 hours a week and had not improved since the Medical Panel had examined me nor had I shown that I possess any new skills believed to be contributing to this added work capacity;

(iii) that my Agent was claiming that the date they are required to begin any payments is the date from when I “completed” the 93cd application (September 2013), and not the date on which I had actually lodged the application (June 2013). Until I had provided a current Tax return (which was a mandatory requirement and for the ATO is March of the following year), the application remained invalid; furthermore they consider my early June capacity date to be irrelevant. Continue Reading

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Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

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