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Am I safe to move? Professor Lorimer Moseley: New understanding of pain and focusing on the patient

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I know the science is tricky to understand but please listen to this interview.

Not only is it important for your brain and as a patient/consumer, but there is a critical suggestion in this podcast for you and what you need to ask your clinician.

BMJ talk medicine

Professor Lorimer Moseley (PT, PhD) is Chair of Physiotherapy at the University of South Australia and a professor of Clinical Neurosciences. people.unisa.edu.au/lorimer.moseley


He combines Oxford rigour with a laconic and very popular Australian style of communication. In this podcast he addresses the questions:

  • What’s new in our understanding of the spinal cord?
  • What should we be telling patients?
  • Is the ‘hands on, hands off’ debate a useful one?
  • How do you feel the profession is performing right now?

On the subject of what should we be telling patients, he argues we should train them to ask clinicians 3 questions.

  1. How do I know my pain system is over-protective?
  2. What can I do to retrain my system to be less protective?
  3. Am I safe to move?

You can find his patient website ‘Tame the Beast’ here: www.tamethebeast.org/#home
You can find is academic/health professional website ‘Body in Mind’ here: www.bodyinmind.org/
And is previous BJSM podcast was on tendons. It has had >17K listens: ow.ly/5OGN30gkaD7.

Australian researchers combine cultural practices with pain management | SBS News

Author:

What great hope this pain management team provide. And I can’t help but think, well, ‘der’!

I’m not being rude, but if professionals were able to understand the cultural background of the patient, and talk with them, not to them, of course pain communication will be easier.

That’s what my Pain Train is all about. The person creates their own profile, in their words, documenting their history and their way…

Please, please, please, listen to the patient!

Australian researchers combine cultural practices with pain management | SBS News

Source: Australian researchers combine cultural practices with pain management | SBS News

Could cultural practices hold the key to help improving pain management? A team of Australian researchers have found evidence to say yes, in at least some cases.

Sydney researchers have pioneered a chronic pain treatment program, specifically designed for people from non-English speaking backgrounds.

Liverpool and Fairfield Hospitals, along with Western Sydney University, teamed up for the nine-month trial, creating a culturally responsive approach to treatment. Continue Reading

Trust me, I’m a patient: pain education for professionals from a lay perspective

Author:

Lay member, British Pain Society Patient Liaison Committee

A young woman with arthritis talking about the rising tide of hostility to disability claimants says: ‘People think I’m faking. I’ve lost friends over it. Pain is invisible and hard for people to understand.’ How many of us could say that we have never thought that someone reporting pain is faking or, at the very least, making too much fuss? This is the society in which we live: intolerant of the pain of others. From childhood onwards we are told to stop whingeing and are often not believed when we report pain. Adults can be intolerant of their partner’s pain and in the workplace colleagues seldom treat kindly weakness of any sort.

These preconceptions and attitudes to other people’s pain are what professionals may have grown up with and may subconsciously bring to the clinical setting. Pain education for professionals should focus not only on the methods of treatment available but equally on the impact of pain and the need to listen to and believe the patient’s story. Pain is what the patient says it is and if he or she has come to you for help, there will be very few instances in which pain relief must be withheld whilst a diagnosis is sought. And yet, often pain management is not addressed until all the avenues of diagnostic tests, scans and specialist opinions have been explored. Students need good communication skills and empathy, and they should be encouraged to think about their own attitudes to pain and how these might affect their professional practice. They should learn that there are very few conditions for which pain relief must be withheld until a diagnosis is made. For the majority of people adequate pain relief can be achieved before a diagnosis is made.

Continue Reading

Destigmatising invisible illnesses, creativity and work

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The arts can be difficult to navigate at the best of times, but what if your particular challenges are invisible? Here’s how the sector can pay attention, remove the stigma and better support individuals.

One of the arts industry’s most valuable resources is its people. People are relied on for their passion, their productivity, and in many cases, their willingness to go “above and beyond” to ensure the sector can flourish.

For anyone working in the arts, such expectations can exacerbate stress and tiredness, but for those with an invisible illness hidden from colleagues or employees, such expectations are simply unrealistic and exclusionary. What happens to your creativity and career when you can’t “push through”?

Stigma and preconceived notions of what illness and disability are often limit what people disclose, explains the co-founder of art collective Sickness and Stealth, Jessica Ibacache. This can result in lack of support, isolation, and marginalisation in the workplace and beyond.

‘Invisible illness can affect people in many different ways; no one experience is the same. People are very quick to judge on how someone appears physically, which can really affect the way people with invisible illness are treated,’ said Ibacache.

Larissa MacFarlane, who is participating in Sickness and Stealth’s current art exhibition, Invisible said the expectations of overwork when installing exhibitions or leading up to an arts event make it difficult for those with invisible illness or a disability to participate.

‘I don’t think that this behaviour is good for even healthy people,” said MacFarlane.

More: Destigmatising invisible illnesses, creativity and work | ArtsHub Australia

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Diagnosis: A Can of Worms

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Can-of-Worms

WARNING: This post contains serious attitude as a result of 10 years of personal experience with chronic pain. The post also contains my personal no nonsense view of living with a chronic illness and (much required) rotten sense of humour, whopping reality check and bonus kick up the backside for anyone who refuses to accept they have a serious health issue.

*Proceed with caution*

Well, surely you can’t blame me for having that kind of attitude after 10 years!

Recently, it dawned on me that when I was diagnosed with chronic pain, it felt like I had been handed a can of worms.

I’ve been mulling over this thought while procrastinating about a second follow-up appointment since my sacral neurostimulator treatment. Specifically, I thought about the time that goes by while I – sometimes neglect to face the intensity of my health issue and what the consequences are as a result of that neglect.

Yep, it translated to a can of worms. Continue Reading

Men & Women: Pelvic Pain Relief + Your First PT Appointment w/ Dr. Susie G

Author:
FemFusion and Dr Susie Gronski

36 minutes of brilliant pelvic pain and awareness conversation with two very experienced professionals. Thank you Fem Fusion and Dr Susie Gronski.

Excerpt from Men & Women: Pelvic Pain Relief + Your First PT Appointment w/ Dr. Susie Gronski YouTube link – please read the warning about language used during this clip.

FemFusion Fitness
Published on 16 Aug 2017

Expert Interview with Dr. Susie Gronski, PT, DPT about DIY pelvic pain relief that you can start doing at home, PLUS what to expect from your first pelvic floor physical therapy appointment! The information provided in this video is for females and males. Continue Reading

Takes more than an app to explain pain

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Body in Mind posted this excellent research from Marina Pinheiro and Gustavo Machado about the abundant health apps out there; What App is Good for My Back?

Pulse+IT also recently posted their story, There’s a bad app for That.

There are various purposes health apps are made. From where I’m standing, my app was never a promise to solve a health problem – that’s impossible.

I’ve been asked many times why Pain Train isn’t available as an app. Pain Train currently is fully functional as a website on any desktop or hand-held device.

The two main agendas of Pain Train, are: Continue Reading

Pelvic Pain: The Ultimate Cock Block

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Dr. Susie and I have established quite a fab connection over the past year or so.

We teamed up to help people with chronic pain with our own various ways – Dr. Susie providing her professional knowledge (and awesome down to earth approach), and I providing my patient input (Dr. Susie loves my Pain Train).

I jumped at Dr. Susie‘s invitation to write the foreword for her book, Pelvic Pain: The Ultimate Cock Block – in fact it was an honor and a pleasure.

From what I hear through my site, men have a more difficult task navigating chronic pain and speaking up about their issues – yes, much tougher than we have it ladies!

So to my dear male followers, don’t hesitate! You can get this book right now on Amazon and be on your way to managing pelvic pain.

And to Dr Susie, thank you so much for writing this much needed resource and for inviting me to be a part of it.

About the book

Pelvic Pain: The Ultimate Cock Block: A no bullsh*t guide to help you navigate through pelvic pain

You woke up one morning expecting a hard on, but instead, all you felt was dick pain. You’re thinking maybe it was a weird sex position or that sports injury from the other day. ‘‘No biggie, it’ll go away,’’ you think to yourself. Continue Reading

Bridge for Pelvic Pain 2nd Annual Pelvic Pain Seminar

Author:
2nd Annual Pelvic Pain Seminar

Learn about chronic pelvic, sexual and genital pain, and integrative treatments.

Presentations by doctors, physical therapists, counselors,health and
wellness experts and patient advocates.

*New this year: Afternoon break-out sessions for patients and caregivers.

Register early as space is limited!

Date & time:
Saturday September 30, 2017
Registration and light breakfast 8:30AM-9:00AM
Seminar 9:00AM-4:30PM

Location:
Tim Gill Center for Public Media
315 E Costilla Street Colorado Springs, CO 80903

RSVP, Speaker List and Tickets:
available on our Event Page at www.bridgeforpelvicpain.org

Making Sense of Pain: A workshop for Health Professionals

Author:
Making Sense of Pain

What sets “Making Sense of Pain” apart from other Pain Management workshops and seminars? We show you how to put this information into practice and improve your interactions with patients to ensure more positive outcomes.

This workshop is dedicated to the memory of Robert Elvey [1942-2013], a WA pioneering physiotherapist.

Information

21st Sep 2017 to 22nd Sep 2017
Time
08.30 – 4.30
Duration
2 days
Registration Closing Date
15th Sep 2017

Wyliie Arthritis Centre
17 Lemnos Street Shenton Park WA

On-site

About the venue
Lunch, morning and afternoon tea provided.

Contact

John Quintner & Melanie Galbraith
John: 0419956418 jqu33431@bigpond.net.au
Melanie: 0405963658 MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au Continue Reading

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Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

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