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Resources for Treating Chronic Pain by the Pain Specialists Australia (PSA) …MY pain team!

By |2019-08-26T17:53:09+10:00July 11th, 2016|Learn, Professional Resources, Read, Tips|

Forgive my bossiness but this post comes from a desperate experience that I lived for 4.5 years. That’s a long time for someone with increasing chronic pain levels and not much hope. I felt isolated and alone in a very foreign world without appropriate treatment, compassion and understanding. Nine years later, I’m hopeful a situation [...]

A new DVD resource, Healing the Pain ‘Down There’: A Guide for Females with Persistent Genital and Sexual Pain

By |2017-12-11T16:28:35+11:00September 8th, 2015|Learn, Professional Resources|

There have been many times during my years of chronic pain where I wondered, ‘Why didn’t I know that?’. Usually, the information is quite basic and I feel as though I’ve been deprived by never knowing something so crucial and important about my own body. I was asked to view and give feedback before this [...]

Back on the treatment trail

By |2017-12-11T16:29:24+11:00August 11th, 2015|Help, My treatment, Professional|

So someone got talking to someone on a plane (you know how that story goes, your eyes begin to glaze over because you're in pain thinking 'if this friend tells me I need to meet someone and sustain a new friendship, I'm going to punch him' - but in the end, it works out that you wished you had sat next to that someone on the plane, and you meet that person and you wished you had met them a very long time ago (like eight years ago for me).

An Integrated Approach to Pelvic Pain

By |2017-12-11T16:31:59+11:00May 8th, 2015|Learn, Professional Resources|

An Integrated Approach to Pelvic Pain Interview with Robert J. Echenberg, medical advisory board ICA. What are the challenges of dealing with overlapping pelvic pain conditions? The pelvic region is the busiest region of the body, both functionally and mechanically. We constantly use our pelvic region with all of the obvious bodily functions of elimination, reproduction, sexual pleasure—and we really can’t do any other activities without structurally using our pelvis as well. Plus the stats are astounding—estimates of up to 30 million women and an unknown number of men suffer from CPP in the U.S. alone. Because there are so many conditions that overlap within the pelvis and elsewhere in the body, the biggest challenge to our system itself is that we are not training pelvic pain specialists who look at the whole person and know how to “connect the dots” regarding pain management expertise. The pelvis is divided up into six or seven different specialties, and if you link all the psychological effects and how the body predictably responds to cumulative injury and trauma, unfortunately few of those specialists are currently being taught 21st century pain science. Meanwhile, those trained in pain management commonly fall short in their training of any of the pelvic organ “triggers.” Patients themselves face the biggest challenge in their quest for someone who recognizes that so many of these overlapping illnesses are really connected.

Robert J. Echenberg, MD

By |2017-12-12T11:31:58+11:00November 24th, 2014|Help, Learn, Professional, Professional Resources|

I don’t think I need to write an introduction for Dr Echenberg or Bridge for Pelvic Pain. The only explanation I feel I need to give is that I was drawn (pardon the pun!) to Dr Echenberg’s fabulous ‘patient expressions’ web page on his site: www.instituteforwomeninpain.com and had to send him an email. I landed [...]

My Peripheral Stimulation implant

By |2017-12-11T15:31:15+11:00March 30th, 2014|About, My treatment|

I begged Professor Teddy to do anything, even to chop my coccyx off but he (and his backed up opinions) suggested not to go the invasive path just yet (removal of the coccyx had also not been very successful in treating chronic pain), we had an option for an implant, a treatment that was reversible, it made more sense. To 'qualify' for a stim you have to go through a trial first. The trial period was two weeks and in that time I had half of two leads placed inside my body (yes this is a full anesthetic/operation), with the remaining half of the leads hanging outside my body connecting to a temporary unit. It's a risky period, one very highly susceptible to infection but it allowed me to test the device and its impact before we implanted the $60k (or so) unit. Am I grateful I had private insurance? You bet! My WorkCover insurer certainly wasn't going to pay, eventually dismissing the surgeons reports as not having providing enough information.

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

By |2017-12-11T16:43:17+11:00January 28th, 2014|Help, Learn, Professional, Professional Resources|

Amy Stein is the founder and a practitioner of Beyond Basics Physical Therapy in NYC, specializing in pelvic floor dysfunction, pelvic pain, women’s health, and manual therapy for men, women, and children while taking a holistic approach to each patient’s entire well-being. She is the author of Heal Pelvic Pain, an easy-read, self-help book. Amy is also a contributor to the medical textbook, Female Sexual Pain Disorders: Evaluation and Management, and serves on the board of the International Pelvic Pain Society, since 2007. She is a well recognized expert in her field, lectures nationwide, and has been interviewed in media outlets ranging from the medical segments of popular TV news shows, like ABC’s 20/20 to such newspapers as the New York Daily News to internet sites like http://www.ourgyn.com. She is also an editor of painchannel.com and a member of the NVA, ICA, as well as many other organizations. Amy received her Masters in Physical Therapy from Nova Southeastern University and is currently working towards her Doctorate in Physical Therapy.

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