National Pain Week 2013

By | 2015-04-23T21:31:48+00:00 July 3rd, 2013|Help, Professional|

(excerpt from Australia's THIRD National Pain Week. People in pain a national health priority! This year we are also building on the petition started last year. Pharmacies and Libraries will have these petitions available for people to sign and [...]

How do I know if I have PN or PNE?

By | 2017-12-11T09:42:18+00:00 June 10th, 2013|About, Help, Learn, Professional, Professional Resources, Pudendal Neuralgia|

Before I get into PN versus PNE, I want to first give you a brief explanation of the physiology of the pudendal nerve and the diagnosis of PN. The pudendal nerve is a large nerve that arises from the S2, S3, and S4 nerve roots in the sacrum, and divides into three branches—the inferior rectal nerve, the perineal branch, and the dorsal clitoral/penile branch. The nerve travels a tortuous course through the pelvis to innervate: • the majority of the pelvic floor muscles, • the perineum, • the perianal area, • the distal third of the urethra • part of the anal canal • the skin of the vulva, the clitoris, portions of the labia in women, • and the penis and scrotum in men. The pudendal nerve travels a torturous course through the pelvis. Patients with PN can have tingling, stabbing, and/or shooting pain anywhere in the territory of the nerve. Symptoms include vulvar or penile pain, perineal pain, anal pain, clitoral pain, and pain at the ischial tuberosities as well as pain with bowel movements, urination, and orgasm.

The Spine & Joint Centre, Netherlands

By | 2017-12-11T14:29:37+00:00 May 28th, 2013|Help, Learn, Professional, Professional Resources|

The kindness of the pain world just keeps on delivering... The time and effort specialists take to email and share their resources and offer advice for pelvic pain / Pundendal Neuralgia (PN) is astounding and something that moves me so much. Having the website setup to be able to pass the information on is the ultimate. The chronic pain world is hellish, but like many of life's screaming contrasts, for all the hellish qualities of pain comes a community that offers warmth, understanding, support, sacrifice, and the utmost kindness. I can go on but my point is, I've found another brilliant pain centre and I want to share it. Quickly. Are you in the Netherlands? I believe you're a phone call away from changing your pain situation (and participating in a ping pong game after your appointment!).

PN Directory: Who can help and where in the world are they?

By | 2018-03-13T17:04:08+00:00 January 26th, 2013|Help, Professional|

Pudendal Neuralgia practitioners around the world. I'm sure there are more practitioners and therapists helping with Chronic Pelvic Pain but these are the ones I have been in touch with or have been referred to from other specialists. Please let me know if you have been treated appropriately so I can keep my resource up-to-date. I do particularly want to hear personal recommendations. Australia Anne-Florence Plante Pelvic Chronic Pain, The Women’s. Physiotherapy Department Peter Courtney 499 Springvale Road, Glen Waverley, VIC, 3150 t (03) 9566 2733 Melbourne Pain Group Professor Teddy (Responsible for my peripheral stimulation device) Precision Neurosurgery 1300 773 247 Neurosurgeon, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Western Hospital, and Northern Hospital Thierry Vancaillie MD (Belgium), FRANZCOG, FFPMANZCA Gynaecologist and Pain Medicine Specialist Conjoint Professor, UNSW Director, Women’s Health and Research Institute of Australia

Pelvic Pain Support Network

By | 2017-12-11T09:42:20+00:00 October 31st, 2012|Help, Professional|

Pelvic Pain Support Network My Pudendal Neuralgia family continues to grow... I've just met this wonderful charity group all for raising awareness and, most importantly, existing to represent sufferers with pelvic pain. They are based in the UK but their efforts and voices span the world. So lovely to be associated with you guys! Thank you for the advocacy pelvic pain sufferers so need. Can you also talk to our Governments so that injured workers have their injuries recognised?

Chronic Pain Info group on Facebook

By | 2017-12-11T09:42:20+00:00 July 17th, 2012|About, Help, Personal, The pain|

Chronic Pain Info is a Facebook group/page. A place to come and learn, share, vent and meet other likeminded individuals who share similar health conditions and concerns. Rachata Brown wrote: How to understand us... people who are dealing with the pain. 1. People with chronic pain seem unreliable (we can’t count on ourselves). When feeling better we promise things (and mean it); when in serious pain, we may not even show up. 2. An action or situation may result in pain several hours later, or even the next day. Delayed pain is confusing to people who have never experienced it. 3. Pain can inhibit listening and other communication skills. It’s like having someone shouting at you, or trying to talk with a fire alarm going off in the room. The effect of pain on the mind can seem like attention deficit disorder. So you may have to repeat a request, or write things down for a person with chronic pain. Don’t take it personally, or think that they are stupid. 4. The senses can overload while in pain. For example, noises that wouldn’t normally bother you, seem too much. 5. Patience may seem short. We can’t wait in a long line; can’t wait for a long drawn out conversation.