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Chronic Pelvic Pain Clinic at the Women’s

By |2017-12-12T15:11:39+00:00January 17th, 2012|Help, Professional|

The clinic offers an alternative approach for women who have tried other treatment options but still have a high level of pain. The staff in the clinic come from a range of health professions. Together we will work with you to explore the range of possible causes for your pain and to offer ways to treat or to help you manage your pain. There is good evidence to suggest that this approach to chronic pain is beneficial. Our aim is to work with you to increase your quality of life.

Chronic Pelvic and Perineal Pain: Consensus on Disease Identity February 4, 2012

By |2017-12-11T10:04:30+00:00November 29th, 2011|Help, Learn, Professional Resources|

A week was spent working with the team of Professor Roger Robert (Anatomist and Neurosurgeon). The CHU in Nantes has a long-standing history in the treatment of pain syndromes and is a premier centre in Europe. During the week we were very fortunate and honoured to be able to follow the team during its activities; clinical, surgical and educational. This resulted in the introduction of the gluteal approach to pudendal nerve release surgery at the Randwick, Sydney campus and has enhanced our understanding and management of patients suffering from the debilitating condition, “pudendal neuralgia”.

Medifocus

By |2017-12-11T10:04:30+00:00November 29th, 2011|Help, Learn, Professional Resources|

You will learn about the latest clinical advances in the management of Peripheral Neuropathy as well as about the treatment options that are available. You will also learn about the doctors, hospitals, and medical centers that are at the leading edge in conducting clinical research about Peripheral Neuropathy. Information on ongoing clinical trials, a list of questions to ask your doctor, and a useful directory of resources and organizations that can help patients with Peripheral Neuropathy complete this report.

Women’s Health and Research Institute of Australia (WHRIA)

By |2017-12-11T09:30:20+00:00November 24th, 2011|Help, Learn, Professional, Professional Resources|

Your symptoms & history indicate that the nerve in the pelvis, the pudendal nerve, may be responsible for all or some of your pain and other symptoms. The pudendal nerve runs from the lower back, then passes between 2 ligaments, then runs along the top of the pelvic floor muscles, then through to the base of the pelvis the pelvis and out to the perineum. Adjacent to the ligaments are muscles: the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) at the front and the obturator and piriformis at the back.

Body in Mind

By |2017-12-11T11:04:15+00:00November 24th, 2011|Help, Learn, Professional, Professional Resources|

The lead scientist, Dr Lorimer Moseley, is particularly interested in the role of the brain and mind in chronic and complex pain disorders. Through collaborations with clinicians, scientists, patients and thoughtful friends, the team is exploring how the brain and its representation of the body change when pain persists, how the mind influences physiological regulation of the body, how the changes in the brain and mind can be normalised via treatment, and how we can teach people about it all in a way that is both interesting and accurate.